** HOW TO "BE PREPARED" IN AN EXTREME SEVERE/TORNADIC STORM - THE CHECKLIST **
 

(STEP 1) - The first item is an NOAA WEATHER RADIO - Like a flashlight.. an absolute must - A detailed checklist below.

These can be purchased at most convenience stores, and larger stores such as Walmart or Radio Shack. the cost is minimal compared to its reliability of needed information during a strong severe event. Tornadoes destroy quickly.. Preparation is key.


ITS ABOUT SAVING LIVES BY HELPING IN RESEARCH AND AWARENESS OF THESE DANGEROUS STORMS.

2011 was a tough year for lives lost, billions of dollars in property destroyed, lives displaced. How do we make a difference out there in the midst of these violent acts of nature?

"You feel so helpless when an EF 4 or larger hits in a close range of your location" says John Hallen. Be prepared if you live in a severe weather prone area. Make preliminary task lists early. Secure your property.

A WAKE UP CALL FOR ARRIVING SEVERE WX ---------->

 
 
twitter
 
"Twitter" as Severe WX Unfolds and 2012 Research is Happening - SWS Twitter

About Tornadoes and the Process of a Successful Preparedness Plan

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds. A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Every state is at some risk from this hazard. Some tornadoes are clearly visible, while rain or nearby low-hanging clouds obscure others. Occasionally, tornadoes develop so rapidly that little, if any, advance warning is possible. Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still. A cloud of debris can mark the location of a tornado even if a funnel is not visible. Tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. It is not uncommon to see clear, sunlit skies behind a tornado. The following are facts about tornadoes:

- They may strike quickly, with little or no warning.

- They may appear nearly transparent until dust and debris are picked up or a cloud forms in the funnel.

- The average tornado moves Southwest to Northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction.

- The average forward speed of a tornado is 30 MPH, but may vary from stationary to 70 MPH.

- Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes as they move onto land.

- Waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water.

- Tornadoes are most frequently reported east of the Rocky Mountains during spring and summer months.

- Peak tornado season in the southern states is March through May; in the northern states, it is late spring through early summer.

- Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m., but can occur at any time.


Know the Terms. Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a tornado hazard:

Tornado Watch: Tornadoes are possible. This simply means that conditions are favorable for tornadoes to develop. In this case you should take precautions to protect you and your property, and listen to the radio to keep informed. Tornadoes are most likely to occur in the late afternoon on a hot spring day. However, tornadoes have occurred in every month at all times of the day or night. When a tornado "watch" is issued, be alert for changes in the weather. Be prepared to act quickly. Remain alert for approaching storms. Watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Tornado Warning: A tornado or strong rotation has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. If one is issued for your area, you should seek shelter immediately! There is little time for closing windows or hunting for a flashlight. It's a good idea to know where things are, and to have an emergency storm kit already prepared.


Take Protective Measures Before a Tornado, Be alert to changing weather conditions.

Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. Look for approaching storms. Also Look for the following danger signs:

1. Dark, often greenish sky. If there is large hail

2. A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)

3. Loud roar, similar to a freight train.

If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.

During a Tornado If you are under a tornado WARNING, seek shelter immediately!


Before the storm hits... A little planning can prevent unnecessary panic and confusion if a tornado does strike.

- Learn the warning signals used in your community. If a siren sounds, that means STAY INSIDE and take cover.

- Consider setting up a neighborhood information program through a club, church group or community group. Hold briefings on safety procedures as tornado season approaches. Set up a system to make sure senior citizens and shut-ins are alerted if there is a tornado warning.

- Put together an emergency storm kit including a battery operated NOAA weather radio, flashlight, batteries and simple first aid items in a waterproof container.

(THE DAYS BEFORE) - PACK AHEAD OF TIME AND HAVE READILY AVAILABLE, WATER, CANNED FOOD, AND ANY MEDICAL PRESCRIPTIONS YOU NEED, IN READY TO GO STATUS. EXTRA CLOTHES, SLEEPING BAGS AND BLANKETS RAINPROOF PACKED FOR USE AFTER THE STORM.

GET TO THE GROCERY STORE EARLY WHEN THE FORECAST IN YOUR AREA IS SEVERE WEATHER APPROACHING.

FIRST IS A GOOD NOAA WEATHER RADIO.. HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF A STORM PREPAREDNESS KIT.

tornadoes

- Make a complete inventory of your possessions for insurance purposes. Keep that list in a bank safe deposit box or other safe place away from home.

- Conduct drills with your family in the home; make sure each member knows the correct procedures if they are at work or school when a tornado hits.

When a tornado watch is in effect... You can take certain precautions to lessen the danger.

- Move cars inside a garage or carport, if possible, to avoid damage from hail that often accompanies severe storms. Keep your car keys and house keys with you.

- Move lawn furniture and yard equipment such as lawnmowers inside (if time permits). Otherwise they could become damaged or act as dangerous projectiles causing serious injury or damage.

- Account for family members at home. Have your emergency kit ready.

When a tornado warning has been issued on the radio or by siren...

- Seek shelter immediately.

- AT HOME: In the basement under something sturdy, like a bench. If there is no basement, a small room in the middle of the house (a closet or bathroom is the best). Always stay away from outside walls and windows.

- AT WORK OR SCHOOL: Designated shelter areas are best. (See University Safety and Assurances webpage on tornadoes) for a listing of the shelter area for your building. Stay away from large open rooms like auditoriums and gymnasiums, and rooms with windows. Lie low with your hands covering the back of your head to reduce neck injury.

- IN SHOPPING MALLS: Go to a designated shelter area or to the center of the building on a low level. Stay away from large, open rooms and windows. Never seek shelter in cars in the parking lot.

- IN MOBILE HOMES OR CARS: Leave the vehicle. Seek a safe structure or lie down in a low area with your hands covering the back of your head and neck. Keep alert for flash floods that often accompany such storms.

After a Tornado...

- Keep calm. Stay in your shelter until after the storm is over.

- Check people around you for injuries. Begin First Aid or seek help if necessary. Always cooperate with local officials.

- Check utility lines and appliances for damage. If you smell gas, open the windows and turn off the main valve. Don't turn on lights or appliances until the gas has dissipated. If electric wires are shorting out, turn off the power.

- When you go outside, watch out for downed power lines.

- Notify your insurance agent and provide as much detail as possible about damage to your property. Follow the agent's directions on filing your claim.

- Take steps to protect your home and furniture from further damage. 1.Clean and dry your furniture, bedding, rugs and carpeting as soon as possible. 2.Board up windows and holes in the walls or roof.

- Don't be rushed into signing repair contracts. Deal with reputable contractors. If you're unsure about contractor's credentials perhaps your agent, claim adjuster, Better Business Bureau or Chamber of Commerce can help. Make sure the contractor you hire is experienced in repair work - not just new construction. Be sure of payment terms and consult your agent or adjuster before you sign any contracts.

- Keep receipts for living expenses beyond your normal ones (such as temporary quarters) and for temporary repair costs so you can seek insurance reimbursement.



THIS PAGE SHOULD BE PRINTED OUT AND REFERENCED WITH ALL IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD.


ALL NEWS ITEMS ARE WRITTEN BY SEVERE WARNING SYSTEMS STAFF. THIS DATA IS ONLY TO BE USED AS PERMITTED BY SEVERE WARNING SYSTEMS. PLEASE CONTACT US BY CLICKING ON THE LINK "CONTACT US"

header.1
© SevereWarningSystems.com. All Rights Reserved.